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Cassiopeia
カシオペア
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Appears On Astronomy
Track 2
Length  ????
Written By Music: Mörck, Holmlid - Lyrics: Mörck
Preceded By Supernova
Followed By Contact


Cassiopeia is the second track of Dragonland's fourth full-length album, Astronomy. Elise Ryd of Amaranthe is featured in this song as well as a solo by Marios Ilipoulos of Nightrage

LyricsEdit

AstronomyEdit

Booklet LyricsEdit

"The sages of ancient Greece told many tales and myths of momentous tragedy and heart gripping sadness. The story of the Aethiopian queen Cassiopeia, however, is without a doubt one of the most poignant litanies the ancient world has to offer:
She was as bafflingly beautiful as she was vain, and she continuously boasted about being more graceful and admirable than her sisters, the ephemeral Nereids. For this, she awoke the wrath of Poseidon himself, who sent down an abhorrent monster to plague both man and beast. According to the white-bearded oracle Ammon this was to continue until Cassiopeia's daughter, Andromeda, was sacrificed before the Cyclopean Gorgon.
Andromeda accepted her appalling fate, but was saved by Perseus and Cassiopeia's intervention moments before being devoured by the beast.
The Olympian Gods, however, had not forgotten Cassiopeia's atrocious boasting, but upon elevating her to the top spire of Olympia to further punish her, they too, were struck by her stupefying beauty. Thus, her amercement was to spend eternity among the stars, lonesome and deserted, but her beauty is to this day for all men to enjoy when the firmament is clear on a summer's night. It is said that you can still hear the winds of the Adriatic coast whisper the following words with a ancient, ethereal melody:
"


Beautiful queen of the waters

Borne by celestial mother

Sublime astrological divinity


Punished for vain intervention

She sacrificed godlike ascension

Stripped of Olympian serenity


"Solar winds

will carry me far away from here

take me to my journey's end"


Hear a goddess cry

a silent hopeless sigh

from a sanctum divine


From the stars she still whispers

Envied among all her sisters

Entwined in a kingdom of infinity


The tears of an astral descension

derived from her moonlit dimension

A star that is fading to obscurity


"So, my wings

will carry me far away from home

bring me to my final rest"


Solo: Mörck

Solo: Marios Iliopolous


Hear a goddess cry

a silent hopeless sigh

from a sanctum divine


Hear a godless cry

when astral angels die

in a sanctum divine

Normal LyricsEdit

"The sages of ancient Greece told many tales and myths of momentous tragedy and heart gripping sadness. The story of the Aethiopian queen Cassiopeia, however, is without a doubt one of the most poignant litanies the ancient world has to offer:
She was as bafflingly beautiful as she was vain, and she continuously boasted about being more graceful and admirable than her sisters, the ephemeral Nereids. For this, she awoke the wrath of Poseidon himself, who sent down an abhorrent monster to plague both man and beast. According to the white-bearded oracle Ammon this was to continue until Cassiopeia's daughter, Andromeda, was sacrificed before the Cyclopean Gorgon.
Andromeda accepted her appalling fate, but was saved by Perseus and Cassiopeia's intervention moments before being devoured by the beast.
The Olympian Gods, however, had not forgotten Cassiopeia's atrocious boasting, but upon elevating her to the top spire of Olympia to further punish her, they too, were struck by her stupefying beauty. Thus, her amercement was to spend eternity among the stars, lonesome and deserted, but her beauty is to this day for all men to enjoy when the firmament is clear on a summer's night. It is said that you can still hear the winds of the Adriatic coast whisper the following words with a ancient, ethereal melody:
"


(chanting) Elize Ryd


Beautiful queen of the waters

Borne by celestial mother

Sublime astrological divinity

Wohh


Punished for vain intervention

She sacrificed godlike ascension

Stripped of Olympian serenity


"Solar winds Elize Ryd

will carry me far away from here Elize Ryd

take me to my journey's end" Elize Ryd


Hear a goddess cry Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

a silent hopeless sigh Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

from a sanctum divine Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)


From the stars she still whispers

Envied among all her sisters

Entwined in a kingdom of infinity


The tears of an astral descension

derived from her moonlit dimension

A star that is fading to obscurity


"So, my wings Elize Ryd

will carry me far away from home Elize Ryd

bring me to my final rest" Elize Ryd


Solo: Mörck

Solo: Marios Iliopolous


Hear a goddess cry Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

a silent hopeless sigh Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

from a sanctum divine Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)


Hear a godless cry Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

when astral angels die Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

in a sanctum divine Elize Ryd (lead), Jonas Heidgert (backing)


Hear a goddess cry Elize Ryd (lead), Elize Ryd (chanting as backing), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

a silent hopeless sigh Elize Ryd (lead), Elize Ryd (chanting as backing), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

from a sanctum divine Elize Ryd (lead), Elize Ryd (chanting as backing), Jonas Heidgert (backing)


Hear a godless cry Elize Ryd (lead), Elize Ryd (chanting as backing), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

when astral angels die Elize Ryd (lead), Elize Ryd (chanting as backing), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

in a sanctum divine Elize Ryd (lead), Elize Ryd (chanting as backing), Jonas Heidgert (backing)

CastingEdit

LineupEdit

TriviaEdit

  • Olof Mörck stated in an interview that the song tells the tale of Queen Cassiopeia, wife of King Cepheus of the mythological Phoenician realm of Ethiopia, who claimed that both her and her daughter Andromeda were more beautiful than all the Nereids, the nymph-daughters of the sea god Nereus. To avoid the God's wrath, she sacrificed her daughter Andromeda by chaining her to a rock near the water's edge, but the Greek hero Perseus saved Andromeda, soon becoming her husband. Poseidon decided that Cassiopeia didn't deserve to escape punishment for her vainness, so he put her in the heavens as a constellation for all eternity.

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